Baseball is the favorite pastime of Americans of all ages. While you may think this fact was born out of history, it is not the exact reason for America’s love for this sport. It’s the tradition—people go to baseball matches with their family to cheer for their favorite team. Parents support their young kid who is going to compete in campus baseball games. To a certain extent, baseball connects family members together. And that is one reason why many kids learn baseball at a young age, which is a good thing because it also trains and prepares them for professional baseball once they have grown up.

Most fathers are excited about teaching their kids how to play baseball. It is no wonder since playing baseball in itself is a fun and thrilling experience, not to mention that it creates a strong father-and-son bond. When springtime comes, fathers and their children troop to the baseball field or their own backyard to play the game. It is one of the physically challenging activities they look forward to.

Teaching the basics of baseball to your kids is a very worthwhile activity. It may take a lot of patience on your part, but you will find the experience a rewarding one later on. You only have to teach the four fundamental moves in baseball: throwing, catching, hitting, and running—just as a coach would with major league players. So you will act as their coach, making sure that they get the grasp of every essential baseball move. If your kids learn the baseball basics, they can play the game in the years to come.

Is this your first time to teach baseball to your kids? You have to buy soft balls first from a sporting goods shop. Soft balls, which look like real baseballs, are safe to use because their softness does not cause injury. These are recommended for children because they can help boost their confidence when playing baseball. Using these balls trains them not to be afraid of being hit by the ball. In addition, it will be easier for them to throw and catch the ball if it is soft.

Aim for simplicity when you’re starting your training sessions. Don’t expect your children to easily get the hang of it. To make learning easier for the kids, you must stand at a short distance from each other. This will facilitate throwing and catching routines. When the kids start to get used with the catching and throwing, you can stand farther away from each other. And when they begin to learn the right way to throw and catch the ball, then you can try exposing them to real baseball.

Just remember that teaching baseball to kids can be a long process. Never pressure them to learn baseball in just a short time—they will eventually become good baseball players in their own pace. Encourage them by making them believe in themselves and by assuring them that it is all right to make mistakes. After all, mistakes help them learn the game better.